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Tag: Hot Pixel Posts (Page 1 of 2)

HOTPIXEL POST: Artist Spotlight – BARBIE BRADY

HP Logo - Barbie Brady (smaller)

Hey there, Art Lovers!  This month at the HotPixel Post-Production blog, we’ve started our Artist Spotlight series, where we periodically focus on the work of a talented artist whose work we love, and whom we think could bring their talents to an indie film production in various capacities – from art direction to marketing. February has been devoted to the work of LA artist, Barbie Brady, whose Drunk Bunnies have come to visit the HotPixel logo this month. This week, I posted an interview I did with her, where she discusses her work and what inspires it.

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But for the past few years, she’s been focusing exclusively on creating and showing her art, most recently at a show with RAW Artists earlier this month. She works in various mediums, and much of her work incorporates personal ephemera – toy instructions, old bingo cards, Polish family bibles. She often spends hours “making paper,” selecting sections for use in her projects. “I love giving things a second life,” Brady says. “And I love [that] these are things from my life: my journal pages, my instructions from my toys. They’re not random things, and I think that adds an element of integrity to what I do.”

In fact, when she did the HotPixel logo this month, she insisted on incorporating technical specs that we actually use to create her bunny vision of our logo, preserving the integrity of the work she did for us.

So, we know what the ephemera says…but what do the bunnies say?

“They say: I love bunnies and I love drinking,” she jokes. But then she tells me about the real reason drunk bunnies are so important to her.

To read the full profile, or to leave a comment, CLICK HERE.

HOTPIXEL POST: HOT LIST – Producer, Allison Vanore and Composer, Rob Gokee

Photo by Marconi Photography.

Photo by Marconi Photography.

Hey there, everyone! I’m actually really excited about this month’s Hot List over at the HotPixel blog, as I had the chance to do a “Valentine’s-themed” interview with one of the coolest couples in independent film. I had the chance to sit down with producer, Allison Vanore and her husband, composer Rob Gokee, and we had a great chat about their careers, and how they navigate their relationship while handling massive workloads, all while promoting their latest collaboration, Love in the Time of Monsters, which drops TOMORROW.

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When they first met up, it was strictly as friends, as Vanore was looking to network, and Gokee was going through a break-up.

“I had dropped off my ex-girlfriend at the airport to go visit, like, the guy she was leaving me to go date,” he says, laughing. “And then I had the meeting with [Allison], and then lunch with a friend.”

“He dropped her off, and met me on the same day!” Vanore adds, gleefully.

Their first professional collaboration was Solo: The Series. But as their professional relationship blossomed into romance, social media began to take notice. “People who knew us on Twitter saw us talking more and more,” Vanore says. “And once we started dating…everyone was watching. It felt like a public thing. People had somehow become invested.”

And yes, they had a wedding hashtag: #RAllieWed. You can still look up all the details of their live-tweeted wedding.

To read the full profile, or to comment, CLICK HERE.

HOTPIXEL POST: ASK OUR COLORIST – Anthony Harris on Integrating VFX Into Your Workflow

Film Title: Snow White and the Huntsman

The blog over at HotPixel Post Production is gonna have a lot of great, new features this year, and one of the features I’m most excited about is our new column, ASK OUR COLORIST, where our amazing Head Colorist, Anthony Harris (who’s done color for movies like Snow White and the Huntsman and Life of Pi), explains his craft. Periodically, he’ll talk about a different aspect of color correction, while I provide a glossary of all the technobabble. 🙂 If you’re a new filmmaker, or even an established one who wants to understand your crew better, check this out!

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Editor’s Note: I asked Anthony to explain how he, as a colorist, integrates visual effects (VFX) into his workflow as he works on a film. Here’s what he had to say:

Usually I do a neutral grade on a plate which is just using lift/gamma/gain with no keys or shapes or anything like that, and send it out to the VFX company. Or, when the visual effect is small, they can apply their effect on the plate, and then they send the raw image back to me and I can bring that plate the rest of the way.

A neutral grade basically says that I’m going to use a basic lift/gamma/gain corrections to put it in the neighborhood of the surrounding footage, and not do anything too dynamic to allow the VFX company to have the range to put their effect in it without clipping values or harming the plate in any way. And when I get it, I still have the range to make it look natural.

But if you’re talking about a big visual effects project where – maybe there’s a greenscreen or bluescreen, and the whole background is a visual effect – maybe I’ll do the foreground plate, then sort of massage the plate into the other plates when the shot comes back from visual effects. If the shot is very VFX heavy, there’s nothing I can really do ahead of time, so I’ll work on the rest of the project until the shots come in, and drop them into the surrounding footage.

For the full post, or to leave a comment, CLICK HERE!

PS – check out the work of my friend, Barbie Brady, as she is HotPixel’s Artist of the Month (another new feature!). You can see her take on the HotPixel logo now through March 2 when you visit the site!

HOTPIXEL POST: Instant: Tony Janning and Roddenberry Entertainment Bring Their Latest to HotPixel

Janning in a scene from Instant. Photo courtesy of JCHB Gallery.

Janning in a scene from Instant. Photo courtesy of JCHB Gallery.

There’s news over at HotPixel, and it involves sci-fi, so listen up, geeks! 😉

HotPixel just completed post-production work on an indie sci-fi short film called Instant, which stars (and was co-produced by) Tony Janning of Legend of Neil fame, and produced by Roddenberry Entertainment! Yes, that Roddenberry. I talked to Janning a little about the film…

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Tony Janning has gained a new respect for producing in the past year. He’s always considered himself an Actor/Writer/Producer, most notably on Comedy Central’s popular digital series, The Legend of Neil, but the first two labels were the ones he wore most often.

Then came Instant.

Instant is a 20-minute dramatic science fiction short film directed by Alex Albrecht and co-produced by Janning, Chad Kennedy, and Roddenberry Entertainment. Yes, as in Star Trek. More specifically, Eugene “Rod” Roddenberry, Jr., who runs Roddenberry Entertainment with C.O.O, Trevor Roth, and produces content of interest to modern sci-fi fans while staying true to his father’s vision for the future. Instant was written and co-produced by Janning’s friend, writer Todd Beauchamp, who first mentioned the story to him over drinks with friends.

“A lot of the themes in it relate to what Roddenberry’s always been about. It comes from a very personal place for [Todd], and there’s a lot of things in it that deal with family, humanity, and hoping for a better future.”

For the full post, or to make a comment, check it out at the HotPixel blog by CLICKING HERE!

HOTPIXEL POST: Tom Grey Takes Player Piano to the Next Level

I’m on a roll over at HotPixel! 🙂 Or, rather, we at HotPixel want to make sure to support the efforts of a member of the extended HotPixel family. Here’s a post up at the HotPixel blog about Tom Grey and Sonya Belousova’s Player Piano, and their current plans and IndieGoGo campaign!

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For those who missed it, Player Piano is a series where classically-trained pianist, Sonya Belousova, plays covers of everything from film/TV/video game scores to pop/rock, hip-hop, metal, and classical pieces. Grey directs and produces captivating videos to accompany her playing, and so far, the results have been stunning….

[…] Player Piano already produces great videos, but Grey and Belousova are looking not only to take the show to the next level, but to create something that is sustainable for years to come. We at HotPixel really want to see that happen, so we’re reaching out to our community – because we want to see quality content flourish on the internet.

For the full post, some cool videos, a link to the IndieGoGo campaign, or to leave a comment of support for the Player Piano team, CLICK HERE.

HOTPIXEL POST: THE HOT LIST: Jason Been, President of Imagecraft

It’s been a while, but here’s the latest at the HotPixel blog! I had the chance to talk to Jason Been, president of Imagecraft, a production rental company that is more hands-on than your average rental house. Indie creators, take note! You’re gonna wanna keep this place in the back of your mind next time you’re working on a project!

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When I asked him about what indie filmmakers need to keep in mind before approaching rentals, Been echoed what many of our Hot List subjects have insisted upon – preparation is key, and approaching a company like Imagecraft earlier in the process will save you time and money  in the long run.

Been says, “The cool thing about this business is that you bring a lot of minds to the table. On an indie project, the creative side is usually one that is getting everything done, and they need a lot of help so that the tech side of things can conform with the creative side of things. So, that’s where it helps if you start the conversation early on, so that the technical side can work with the creative. Sometimes, you have these grandiose ideas – which are great – but then can you cover these things financially? Can your technical folks cover you with whatever you need?”

And most importantly, “The earlier you plan, the cheaper it’ll be.”

For the full post, or to leave a comment, CLICK HERE!

HOTPIXEL POST: The Hot List – Writer/Producer/Director Tom Grey of Player Piano

It’s been a while, but there’s a new Hot List over at the HotPixel blog! The subject of this month’s Hot List is probably very familiar to many of the geeks in my social media feeds – it’s Tom Grey, writer/producer/director and creator of Player Piano on YouTube.

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Geek & Sundry alum, writer/producer/director Tom Grey, arrived in Los Angeles twelve years ago, as many others do, determined to break into the entertainment industry. His first gigs were in reality television, which he hated, and after a while they prompted him to leave the industry for a bit to focus exclusively on his writing. He supported his writing habit by working as a laundromat salesman.

That’s right. A laundromat salesman. As in, he sold a lot of industrial-sized washers and dryers. The things we do for love, amirite?

However, he couldn’t stay away from the industry for long. He began freelancing as a camera assistant, taking on several jobs with Disney through HotPixel! Yup, he’s one of ours! But, of course, he also wanted to create his own projects.

“There hadn’t been a movie that I’d made yet, and I started to get a little bit frustrated about the lack of just…making stuff,” Grey explains. “What ended up happening was that I heard from a friend who was making some of those Doritos Super Bowl Ads, and it was sort of ‘Let’s get together and just have an excuse to make something.’ So we made them, and I directed them, and I had a ton of fun doing them. And actually Art and the team over at HotPixel colored them, which was a lot of fun. That led to a short film that I did called Undying Love, and that’s a little zombie short film that I did that ended up going to film festivals and stuff. And that led to me working for Stan Lee.”

For the full post, or to leave comments, CLICK HERE!

HOTPIXEL POST: "STRING THEORY AT THE HOLLYSHORTS FILM FESTIVAL – FRIDAY!"

Photo Credit: Bill Young Photography.

Photo Credit: Bill Young Photography.

Hey there, everyone! If you’re down with indie film in L.A. you might want to check out the Hollyshorts Film Festival August 14-23! It’s a great place to see some awesome new films as well as network with fellow indie creators.

AND, a HotPixel project is gonna be screening there on Friday! 🙂 I wrote about it over at the HotPixel blog…

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You’ve heard about the awesome, musical short film, String Theory, here at the blog before! Well, now it’s moving onward and upward as it travels the film festival circuit, and we wanted to make sure you have the chance to go see it on the big screen!

String Theory has been selected for screening at the 10th Annual Hollyshorts Film Festival at the TCL Chinese Theater. The entire festival runs from August 14-23, but String Theory is screening in the 3D AND VISUAL STIMULATION block on this Friday, August 15th at 7:30PM!

For the full post, as well as more info on the 10th Annual Hollyshorts Film festival, CLICK HERE.

HOTPIXEL POST: "HotPixel Helps Trigger Street and Jameson Whiskey JUMP!"

Uma Thurman stars in three short films by first-time filmmakers. Photo Courtesy of Jameson First Shot.

Uma Thurman stars in three short films by first-time filmmakers. Photo Courtesy of Jameson First Shot.

The latest over at the HotPixel blog features Uma Thurman! Not only that, but it features Barak Hardley, one of the stars of Ashleigh Nichols and Eddie Beasley’s awesome web comedy, Coffee Shop Squatters!

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HotPixel recently handled color correction on the latest Uma Thurman project!

The sixteen-minute short film, written and directed by Jessica Valentine, is one of the winners of Jameson First Shot, a three-year-old contest produced by Kevin Spacey’s Trigger Street Productions that allows three first-time filmmakers from different parts of the world (the US, Russia, and South Africa) the opportunity to have their first films produced professionally and star Uma Thurman.

Lisa McGuire, one of the producers along with Kevin Spacey, Dana Brunetti, and Carter Swan at Trigger Street, spoke with me about this opportunity that Jameson provides to first-time filmmakers.

“It’s a wonderful opportunity for first-time filmmakers to have the Hollywood Experience with a short film. So we surround them with a very experienced crew – for example, I’ve worked in this business for twelve years – so we have wonderful people to bring on, and a lot of these people have returned all three years. That’s how wonderful and fun this project is. A lot of [crew] do this for much less than normal rates, for the love of what it is, and they bring in a star, and we make a movie for them. Everything from the pre-production meetings, to the location scouting, to shooting, to post-production. It’s really fun to work with these directors – to actually bring them to Los Angeles and see what the typical L.A. filmmaking experience is.”

For the full post, or to leave a comment, CLICK HERE!

 

HOTPIXEL POST: The Hot List – Tyler Palmer & Cole Palmer of Patreon

(left to right) Cole Palmer, Sam Yam, Tyler Palmer, Anthony Privitelli, and Jack Conte. Photo courtesy of Patreon.

(left to right) Cole Palmer, Sam Yam, Tyler Palmer, Anthony Privitelli, and Jack Conte. Photo courtesy of Patreon.

July’s HotPixel Hot List is up at the HotPixel blog, and it’s about a crowdfunding site that I know a lot of you have expressed interest in. I had the chance to speak with Tyler Palmer (Director of Operations) and Cole Palmer (Director of Creator Relations) over at Patreon about what sets their company apart and how a model like Patreon’s can help filmmakers and creators of longer-form content. If you’re curious about that at all, you’ll wanna check this out!

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Patreon fills a niche that allows creators who may have fallen through the cracks before – or who have been underpaid by AdSense through YouTube – to have a shot at making a living. Tyler told me the story of the birth of Patreon by telling me how Conte started the site.

“Jack launched his first music video called Pedals, and he spent close to $10,000 on the music video. He got his check from YouTube, from AdSense, in the mail for $120. So, he went into debt making this music video, and that’s why Patreon exists,” he explains with a laugh. He then told a similar story about musician, Molly Lewis, who had 30,000 views on a video that ended up paying her a whopping $60. Her paycheck from Patreon for the same video? $2,300. “I hear the story too many times, from people who have thousands of eyeballs, millions of eyeballs, and then they get their check for fifty-three dollars,” says Tyler. Fan love translates directly into support for the artist without having to go through advertisers, which is one of the many things that makes Patreon special.

Now, this is all very well and good for digital creators of short-form content, but what about creators of long-form content – like, independent films, for example. Can they make a home at Patreon, too?

For the complete article, as well as to leave a comment about it, CLICK HERE.

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