l-r: Tara Madison Avery, Dylan Edwards, J.D. Saxon, Ashley Love, Elizabeth Lain, Melanie Gillman.

l-r: Tara Madison Avery, Dylan Edwards, J.D. Saxon, Ashley Love, Elizabeth Lain, Melanie Gillman.

I was working my non-writing day job yesterday, so I didn’t get this up at Beacon until late – but up there now is my second post this week from SDCC. It’s about the first-ever transgender panel at Comic-Con!

EXCERPT:

Lastly, and interestingly, was Nolan, author of Love on the Racks: A History of American Romance Comics, who was a Comic-Con Special Guest and has been a comics historian for going on 50 years. She is also 70+ years old, and was a trans woman at a time when transgender people didn’t really have the vocabulary to discuss it. It was often cringe-inducing to hear her say things like “In my day, you were either a boy or a girl, it didn’t matter how you got there. I knew I was a girl, so I did what I had to do” while at the same time using terms like “real girl” and “real boy” to mean “genetic girl” or “genetic boy.” Or, watching her be confused by terms like “genderqueer,” as if at a certain point in LGBT activism and Feminism, she just stopped paying attention. The younger artists on the panel got a bit tense listening to her, but I thought that her point of view was important, in order to really demonstrate how far we’ve come in at least being able to talk about gender fluidity and sexuality in a more nuanced, non-binary way. 

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